On LaSalle Street, at Jackson…

…rests the Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT), with the stylized statue of Ceres, the Roman goddess, perched atop.

Source:

In ancient Roman religion, Ceres (/ˈsɪərz/) was a goddess of agriculture, grain crops, fertility and motherly relationships.[1] She was originally the central deity in Rome’s so-called plebeian or Aventine Triad, then was paired with her daughter Proserpina in what Romans described as “the Greek rites of Ceres”. Her seven-day April festival of Cerealia included the popular Ludi Ceriales (Ceres’ games). She was also honoured in the May lustration of fields at the Ambarvalia festival, at harvest-time, and during Roman marriages and funeral rites.

Ceres is the only one of Rome’s many agricultural deities to be listed among the Di Consentes, Rome’s equivalent to the Twelve Olympians of Greek mythology. The Romans saw her as the counterpart of the Greek goddess Demeter, whose mythology was reinterpreted for Ceres in Roman art and literature.

LaSalle Street is the finacial area of downtown Chicago…all the ‘big banks’ have offices here…and, of course, the Chicago Board of Trade has occupied its space for well over a century.

Source:

The Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT), established in 1848, is the world’s oldest futures and options exchange. More than 50 different options and futures contracts are traded by over 3,600 CBOT members through open outcry and eTrading. Volumes at the exchange in 2003 were a record breaking 454 million contracts. On 12 July 2007, the CBOT merged with the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) to form the CME Group, a CME/Chicago Board of Trade Company. CBOT and three other exchanges (CME, NYMEX, and COMEX) now operate as designated contract markets (DCM) of the CME Group.

Yesterday, I stepped out onto the street during a lull in traffic to get this shot:

But back in 1997, when I first noticed Ceres, I wrote this:

ATOP CBOT

Ceres has no face

Eyes and nose, not a trace

No smile, no frown

To let us know

If she’s up

Or down.

Copyright 1997  http://www.anotherthousandwords.wrodpress.com

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