This past Saturday…

…I took a break from all the work and walked up the street to the ArchitectureChicago Open House, a city-wide event.

Of course, my sole architectural interests were a mere block and a half walk away!

The Emil Bach House Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, 1915

The Emil Bach House
Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, 1915

As much as I wanted to see inside, I passed by because there was no waiting line next door at the Cat’s Cradle Bed and Breakfast, another renovation financed a few years back by Col. J.N. Pritzker of Tawani Enterprises, Inc.

The Bach House sure looked great from the outside, though the renovation is not yet 100% complete!

The Bach House sure looked great from the outside, though the renovation is not yet 100% complete!

As I walked up the steps to Cat's Cradle, I looked back and took a shot of the looong line at the Bach House. It was a beautiful Autumn morning, and the plantings at both properties were spectacular! But, I quickly turned, and entered a structure I've been very, very curious about.

As I walked up the steps to Cat’s Cradle, I looked back and took a shot of the loooong line at the Bach House.
It was a beautiful Autumn morning, and the plantings at both properties were spectacular!
But, I quickly turned, and entered a structure I’ve been very, very curious about.

Love this door which I believe is the original from 1919, and knew I'd also love the interior!

LOVE this door which I believe is the original from 1919, and knew I’d also love the interior!

I almost felt as if I had somehow ‘gone back in time’, to a much gentler, more civilized era.

The Architect was a Mr. Newman, who drew much inspiration from FLW, as evidenced by the amount of fine woodworking, original wood flooring...

The architect was a Mr. Newman, who drew much inspiration from Frank Lloyd Wright, as evidenced by the amount of fine woodworking, original wood flooring…

...and decorative touches such as this lovely lamp atop the newel post.

…and decorative touches such as this lovely lamp atop the newel post.

Cat’s Cradle contains five bedrooms, each with the flavor of that bygone time, yet each is technologically up-to-date.

I’ll title them in the sequence I viewed them.

Bedroom #1

Bedroom #1

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Bedroom #2

Bedroom #2

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Bedroom #3

Bedroom #3

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Bedroom #4

Bedroom #4

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Bedroom #5

Bedroom #5

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Because I’ve been so busy in the apartment, painting not only walls but also furniture, and doing some fall cleaning in between, I haven’t gotten around to processing any other images from this wonderful tour.

There’s just one ceiling area to give a third coat, and then only the studio remains…I’ll take my time and do that piecemeal, as it is small and requires a lot of shuffling things back and forth—and I’m pretty ‘pooped’ right now!

I did, however, have a fine chat with one of the Innkeepers, Wayde Cartwright, which was both informative and most enjoyable!

If you plan to visit Chicago on business or vacation, give Wayde or his fellow Innkeeper, Bruce Boyd, a call at 1.773.764.9851, or you can visit www.catscradlechicago.com.

The rates are extremely reasonable, especially when you consider the surroundings and all the amenities provided!

(Yes, that was pretty blatant advertising from me, but if I were visiting, I’d surely love staying here!)

While walking home…

…from the grocer the other, I happened upon this signpost which I realized I’d never shown here before.

It’s just less than a block from where I live, and it brings back so many childhood memories, because this was the very first children’s program I viewed when my Dad bought our first television in 1950–“Kukla, Fran and Ollie”!

Please, take a moment to read…this TV program gave me and my brothers many hours of great entertainment!

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Tillstrom-2

To think, he gave puppet shows from his apartment window!

Now, I’ve passed this building many, many times, always admiring it for having that ‘certain something’…I just really like the look of it, so I began photographing it in relation to the information re: Mr. Burt Tillstrom.

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I figured that this had to have been the puppet show window, as I could envision the neighborhood kids gathering on the lawn below, enjoying themselves on a war Summer evening.

I figured that this had to have been the puppet show window, as I could envision the neighborhood kids gathering on the lawn below, enjoying themselves on a war Summer evening.

I was about to walk away when I noticed a plaque to the right of that window.

I walked right over the lawn to take a shot, thinking it was a typical ‘management’ sign–but NO!

To my surprise, it not only signified the name of the building, but also the architect!

Are you as surprised as I?

Are you as surprised as I?

As I recall from viewing a DVD on Mr. Wright’s life recently, he was really scrambling for money in 1918, so perhaps he took this commission ‘for the bucks’, diverging from his normal-for-that-time Prairie style architecture!

As I said, the building has that ‘certain something’, but I hadn’t realized it was THAT ‘certain something’!

On this day…

…I’d like to wish all fathers a very Happy Father’s Day!

Father's Day 2013

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The little guy on the left is my own Dad, who passed just before Father’s Day in 1994.

The photograph was taken in the summer of 1919 and was originally hand-tinted.

My Dad had a copy negative made back in 1980, from which I printed a number of  8×10 black and whites, then sepia-toned.

Copies were given to his two brothers and four sisters.

My grandparents were immigrants from what was then Czechoslovakia, who came to America in 1912.

I’m pleased they revered the art of photography, so that I am able to present this image today, ninety-four years later!