There were so many images…

…I decided to turn Macy’s Christmas Windows into a short video!

Enjoy…and have a Happy Christmas and a Merry New Year!

Almost 91 years old…

…and still going strong!

The Chicago Theatre–State Street/Lake Street in the Chicago Loop

From the Chicago Theatre’s website, where you can also view several pictures of the interior:

The grandeur of The Chicago Theatre often leaves its visitors breathless. The elegant lobby, majestic staircase and beautiful auditorium complete with murals above the stage and on the ceiling, are components of an amazing building called “the Wonder Theatre of the World” when it opened on October 26, 1921.

The Chicago Theatre was the first large, lavish movie palace in America and was the prototype for all others. This beautiful movie palace was constructed for $4 million by theatre owners Barney and Abe Balaban and Sam and Morris Katz and designed by Cornelius and George Rapp. It was the flagship of the Balaban and Katz theatre chain.

Built in French Baroque style, The Chicago Theatre’s exterior features a miniature replica of Paris’ Arc de Triomphe, sculpted above its State Street marquee. Faced in a glazed, off-white terra cotta, the triumphal arch is sixty feet wide and six stories high. Within the arch is a grand window in which is set a large circular stained-glass panel bearing the coat-of-arms of the Balaban and Katz chain – two horses holding ribbons of 35-mm film in their mouths.

The grand lobby, modeled after the Royal Chapel at Versailles, is five stories high and surrounded by gallery promenades at the mezzanine and balcony levels. The grand staircase is patterned after that of the Paris Opera House and ascends to the various levels of the Great Balcony.

The 3,600 seat auditorium is seven stories high, more than one half of a city block wide, and nearly as long. The vertical sign “C-H-I-C-A-G-O,” at nearly six stories high, is one of the few such signs in existence today. A symbol of State Street and Chicago, the sign and marquee are landmarks in themselves, as is the 29-rank Wurlitzer theatre pipe organ.

Read more here.

These shots were taken last Saturday afternoon while walking north on State Street.  Here’s a view of the theatre from the intersection with Benton Place–notice the water storage tank (used in case of a stage fire) and the signage painted on the brick, making it obvious that the tall building on the south side of Benton did not exist when the theatre was built!

The Chicago Theatre (south facade)–Benton Place

It was not…

…a typical Saturday afternoon on State Street here in Chicago.  A ‘festival with no name’ closed the street to traffic from Van Buren Street all the way north to Lake Street.

There were Mexican dancers on the sun-dappled asphalt…

…a fencing demonstration…

…and, curiously, a man and a woman abseiling down the facade of the Wit Hotel!

There were maps every so often, showing what was where (a lot of tents distributing business brochures), but no mention of a title for this unusual presentation.  There was loud music everywhere, sounding very conflicting, and the few businesses I stopped in had no notice of the street closure.

Quite surprising, but on the whole, it made for some good images, don’t you think?

Each of us is exceptional…

…no matter what SOMEONE ELSE may say!

They used to tell me I was building a dream

And so I followed the mob

When there was earth to plow or guns to bear

I was always there, right on the job

 

They used to tell me I was building a dream

With peace and glory ahead

Why should I be standing in line

Just waiting for bread?

 

Once I built a railroad, I made it run

Made it race against time

Once I built a railroad, now it’s done

Brother, can you spare a dime?

 

Once I built a tower up to the sun

Brick and rivet and lime

Once I built a tower, now it’s done

Brother, can you spare a dime?

 

Once in khaki suits, gee, we looked swell

Full of that Yankee Doodly Dum

Half a million boots went slogging through Hell

And I was the kid with the drum

 

Say, don’t you remember? They called me ‘Al’

It was ‘Al’ all the time

Why don’t you remember?

I’m your pal

Say buddy, can you spare a dime?

 

Once in khaki suits, ah, gee, we looked swell

Full of that Yankee Doodly Dum

Half a million boots went slogging through Hell

And I was the kid with the drum

 

Oh, say, don’t you remember? They called me ‘Al’

It was ‘Al’ all the time

Say, don’t you remember?

I’m your pal Buddy, can you spare a dime?

Lyric courtesy: http://www.metrolyrics.com/brother-can-you-spare-a-dime-lyrics-bing-crosby.html

And please remember my advice:

KEEP GOING  Copyright 2012  http://www.anotherthousandwords.wordpress.com

Because my followers and readers…

…are such wonderful human beings, I figured I’d try to say thank you, somehow.

But Stephen Sondheim is surely a better lyricist than I could ever be, and Bernadette Peters has a voice much better than mine (these days) and so much ‘staying-power’ on the Broadway stage (where I once wanted to be), I decided to present this…and the thanks is from my old heart:

 

Not A Day Goes By

(Stephen Sondheim)

Not a day goes by
Not a single day
But you’re somewhere a part of my life
And it looks like you’ll stay

As the days go by
I keep thinking when does it end
Where’s the day I’ll have started forgetting
But I just go on thinking and sweating

And cursing and crying
And turning and reaching
And waking and dying

And no, not a day goes by
Not a blessed day
But you’re still somehow part of my life
And you won’t go away

So there’s hell to pay
And until I die

I’ll die day after day after day
After day
After day after day after day

Til the days go by
Til the days go by
Til the days go by

Are there still fields of barley? Anywhere?

A musical interlude, welcome by some, and necessary to many.

 

GORDON

He sings of many places
I’ve only been in my mind
A soothing voice with traces
An accent of some kind.

A man of diverse talents
Home on the rock ‘n’ roll range
Seizes all the elements
Real cultural exchange.

Trains in the distance
The man in his prime
Had I met him perchance
We’d have had a good time.

Copyright 2000  http://www.anotherthousandwords.wordpress.com

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Just so you know, I really don’t like this ‘rhyming’ stuff I occasionally set forth…it just seems to happen, and sounds okay, I guess.