This past Saturday…

…I took a break from all the work and walked up the street to the ArchitectureChicago Open House, a city-wide event.

Of course, my sole architectural interests were a mere block and a half walk away!

The Emil Bach House Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, 1915

The Emil Bach House
Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, 1915

As much as I wanted to see inside, I passed by because there was no waiting line next door at the Cat’s Cradle Bed and Breakfast, another renovation financed a few years back by Col. J.N. Pritzker of Tawani Enterprises, Inc.

The Bach House sure looked great from the outside, though the renovation is not yet 100% complete!

The Bach House sure looked great from the outside, though the renovation is not yet 100% complete!

As I walked up the steps to Cat's Cradle, I looked back and took a shot of the looong line at the Bach House. It was a beautiful Autumn morning, and the plantings at both properties were spectacular! But, I quickly turned, and entered a structure I've been very, very curious about.

As I walked up the steps to Cat’s Cradle, I looked back and took a shot of the loooong line at the Bach House.
It was a beautiful Autumn morning, and the plantings at both properties were spectacular!
But, I quickly turned, and entered a structure I’ve been very, very curious about.

Love this door which I believe is the original from 1919, and knew I'd also love the interior!

LOVE this door which I believe is the original from 1919, and knew I’d also love the interior!

I almost felt as if I had somehow ‘gone back in time’, to a much gentler, more civilized era.

The Architect was a Mr. Newman, who drew much inspiration from FLW, as evidenced by the amount of fine woodworking, original wood flooring...

The architect was a Mr. Newman, who drew much inspiration from Frank Lloyd Wright, as evidenced by the amount of fine woodworking, original wood flooring…

...and decorative touches such as this lovely lamp atop the newel post.

…and decorative touches such as this lovely lamp atop the newel post.

Cat’s Cradle contains five bedrooms, each with the flavor of that bygone time, yet each is technologically up-to-date.

I’ll title them in the sequence I viewed them.

Bedroom #1

Bedroom #1

*

Bedroom #2

Bedroom #2

*

Bedroom #3

Bedroom #3

*

Bedroom #4

Bedroom #4

*

Bedroom #5

Bedroom #5

* * *

Because I’ve been so busy in the apartment, painting not only walls but also furniture, and doing some fall cleaning in between, I haven’t gotten around to processing any other images from this wonderful tour.

There’s just one ceiling area to give a third coat, and then only the studio remains…I’ll take my time and do that piecemeal, as it is small and requires a lot of shuffling things back and forth—and I’m pretty ‘pooped’ right now!

I did, however, have a fine chat with one of the Innkeepers, Wayde Cartwright, which was both informative and most enjoyable!

If you plan to visit Chicago on business or vacation, give Wayde or his fellow Innkeeper, Bruce Boyd, a call at 1.773.764.9851, or you can visit www.catscradlechicago.com.

The rates are extremely reasonable, especially when you consider the surroundings and all the amenities provided!

(Yes, that was pretty blatant advertising from me, but if I were visiting, I’d surely love staying here!)

At the Emil Bach House parkway…

Leaves on the trees are yellowing...

…leaves on the trees are yellowing…

...the daisies lose color and petals in stages...

…the Daisies lose color and petals in stages…

...and the Hostas fade gracefully.

…and the Hostas fade gracefully.

As for the renovation of the 1915 Frank Lloyd Wright-designed house, the new layer of stucco is being applied, and I’m certain there is work going on inside as well.

Bach House Stucco-1

A closer look:

Bach House Stucco-2

In certain gardens…

…it seems Summer lingers on…

...as Gardenias continue to bud...

…as Gardenias continue to bud…

...and slowly transform...

…and slowly transform…

...into full blossoms, perfuming the air...

…into full, creamy blossoms, perfuming the air…

...while orangey Hibiscus display as singles...

…while orangey Hibiscus display themselves as singles…

...or surprise the gardener as doubles!

…or surprise the gardener as brilliant, showy doubles!

Looking Up: She’s been up there…

…for nearly ninety years, and still she smiles at everyone!

The Painted Lady

As you can see, I had to do a goodly amount of Photoshopping…just to allow you to see that truly beautiful smile.  Here’s the original:

The Painted Lady–Original

There are always changes to be seen…

…in the window at the local tailor’s shop.

Buttons, Bins and Lint

And…if you look closely, you can see my Converse ‘Chuck Taylor All Stars’ in the reflection!

I did not know…

…quite what to make of these when I saw them in my little local grocer’s (not one of the huge chain stores), so I took a few shots and did some research!

Juju Apples

From the Upland Nursery web site:

Jujube Apples

The jujube is a small, deciduous tree, growing to 40 feet tall in Florida, but smaller in size in California.  The naturally drooping tree is graceful, ornamental and often thorny with branches growing in a zig-zag pattern.  The wood is very hard and strong. Jujube cultivars vary in size and conformation, with some being very narrow in habit and others being more widespread.  One cultivar, the So, seems to be fairly dwarfing in habit.  After 30 years of growth in an average site, trees can be 30 feet tall with a crown diameter of up to 15 feet.

Fruit: The fruit is a drupe, varying from round to elongate and from cherry-size to plum-size depending on cultivar.  It has a thin, edible skin surrounding whitish flesh of sweet, agreeable flavor. The single hard stone contains two seeds.  The immature fruit is green in color, but as it ripens it goes through a yellow-green stage with mahogany-colored spots appearing on the skin as the fruit ripens further.  The fully mature fruit is entirely red.

Shortly after becoming fully red, the fruit begins to soften and wrinkle.  The fruit can be eaten after it becomes wrinkled, but most people prefer them during the interval between the yellow-green stage and the full red stage.  At this stage the flesh is crisp and sweet, reminiscent of an apple.

Under dry conditions jujubes lose moisture, shrivel and become spongy inside.  Tests in Russia indicate a very high vitamin C content.  The fruit has been used medicinally for millennia by many cultures.  One of its most popular uses is as a tea for sore throat.

Harvest: The crop ripens non-simultaneously, and fruit can be picked for several weeks from a single tree.  If picked green, jujubes will not ripen. Ripe fruits may be stored at room temperature for about a week.  The fruit may be eaten fresh, dried or candied.

I didn’t buy any…maybe next time, because they do sound interesting, don’t they?

From an early Autumn market

These images were taken with my old Olympus 3.2 megapixel camera seven years ago in Cudahy, WI while I was visiting an old friend.  I dragged them off my external drive and re-worked them in Photoshop (TM), to kind of give them the processing I’ve been recently perfecting.  Hope you enjoy!

Cabbage, Revisited

“Turban” Squash

Multi-color Carrots

Purple Cabbage

Hot Pepper Rainbow

Swiss Chard, Revisited