The perfect blend…

…of Autumn’s colors!

Coleus

Autumn Coleus-1 WM

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Autumn Coleus-2 WM

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Autumn Coleus-3 WM

Fit for a…

DOCTOR!

During my last appointment, I mentioned to my doctor that I was again baking bread, and made a ‘mean Challah‘.

He is Jewish, and quickly retorted, “I LOVE Challah!!!”

Well, yesterday was a warm, dry day–perfect bread-baking weather, and as his birthday was two weeks ago, I decided to give him a belated birthday gift!

And, I did–with these!

I took the pix quickly, as I wanted to get them delivered while the Challah was still warm, so they're not the greatest!

I took the pix quickly, as I wanted to get them delivered while the Challah was still warm, so they’re not the greatest!  But he was impressed, and thanked me twice!

 

The loaf at top left is the one I presented to the doctor. The smaller loaves were baked in little oval pie pans--I gave each of the nurses one, and also gave one to the wonderful phlebotomist who draws my blood every month! She dove right in, proclaiming the Challah excellent, and asked for the recipe, which I will print out for her!

The loaf at top left is the one I presented to the doctor.
The smaller loaves were baked in little oval pie pans–I gave each of the nurses one, and also gave one to the wonderful phlebotomist who draws my blood every month!
She dove right into the loaf, proclaiming the Challah excellent, and asked for the recipe, which I will print out for her!

Of course, I had my camera, and took advantage of the lovely small Hibiscus in the center planting of the circular drive of the building, which I processed today and turned into Watercolors!

Small Red Hibiscus-1 Watercolor

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Small Red Hibiscus-2 Watercolor

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Small Red Hibiscus-3 Watercolor

N.B.:  I am so behind in viewing blogs I follow, so I ask you to please excuse my tardiness.

The breads were kneaded by hand, and required three risings, so a lot of time was spent on that, which is very hard on the fingers.

I found that by 7:00 last night, I had no energy left to do much of anything, and typing became very painful…so I’ll get to your blogs ‘little by little, bit by bit’–thanks!!!

It’s been a dark, dreary day…

…here in Chicago.

I spent quite a few hours digging out old caulk above my bathroom sink and around the tub.

And yes, I am tired…but not too tired to show you the beauties captured the other day in the parkway in front of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Emil Bach House!

A white Hyacinth, almost fully open

A white Hyacinth, almost fully open

Purple Hyacinth, also ready to burst open

Purple Hyacinth, also ready to burst open

Tulips, color unknown, but looking very elegant...even if they have no buds yet

Tulips, color unknown, but looking very elegant…even if they have no buds yet

Lastly, these were quite a surprise:

Peony sprouts, also color unknown (but I believe they are whitish, with a few deep red flecks), reaching for the sun

Peony sprouts, also color unknown (but I believe they are whitish, with a few deep red flecks), reaching for the sun

As we are in the last week of April, and its flower-bringing showers, I hope all you gardeners out there are also seeing some marvelous Flora…at last!

Today’s lake…

4:07 PM (CDT)

4:07 PM (CDT)

…and, from Saturday, the first tulips!

First Tulips-2

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First Tulips-3

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Then there are these tulips, struggling to grow in a corner planting.

A new variety, perhaps?

A new variety, perhaps?

Not at all!

They have been spray-painted RED by the civil engineers, to mark the path of the underground phone and electric lines to be avoided by construction crews digging up the parkways to install new PVC gas lines.

To me, they look quite sad and I hope they recover to produce gorgeous blooms!

They’re chock full of Vitamin C…

…but don’t plan on using them unless you know for a fact they haven’t been sprayed with any type of insecticide!

Rose Hips-1

From Wikipedia:

The rose hip, also known as rose haw or rose hep, is the fruit of the rose plant, that typically is red-to-orange, but ranges from dark purple to black in some species. Rose hips begin to form after successful pollination of flowers in spring or early summer, and ripen in late summer through autumn.

Rose Hips-2

During World War II, the people of Britain were encouraged through letters to The Times newspaper, articles in the British Medical Journal, and pamphlets produced by Claire Loewenfeld, a dietitian working for Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children, to gather wild-grown rose hips and to make a vitamin C syrup for children. This was because German submarines were sinking many commercial ships: citrus fruits from the tropics were very difficult to import.

Rose hips are (also)  used to help prevent colds and influenza.

You can read the entire article here.

This tiny tree…

…sits on the window sill of a local restaurant named “Jamaican Jerk”…I’ve had some of their food in the past, and it IS delicious!

It looks to be hand-made, and I feel it's a perfect symbol for this, the "Season of Giving"!

It looks to be hand-made; I feel it’s a perfect symbol for this, the “Season of Giving”!

In the neighborhood…

…some have gone ‘all out’ decorating for the season! These images were taken at the corner of Sheridan Road and Birchwood Avenue during last Saturdays rain.

Birchwood Avenue Decor-1

 

Birchwood Avenue Decor-2

 

Birchwood Avenue Decor-3

 

Birchwood Avenue Decor-4